Top 10 Lists…

To commemorate 100 posts published on Tuesday’s Tips For Staying In The Target Language, here are some Top 10 (and 15) Lists. In other news, I’ll be taking some time off from publishing these posts every Tuesday. Click here if you care to contribute opinions, comments and feedback regarding the future of this blog on a survey.

Top 10 Most Shared Posts:

  1. How To Avoid “Freaking Out” Novice L2 Learners When Staying In The Target Language
  2. How Not (I Repeat: NOT) To Assess The Progress Of L2 Students In A 90+% Target Language Classroom
  3. Debunking 5 “Teaching In The Target Language Myths”
  4. Debunking 5 MORE “Teaching In The Target Language Myths”
  5. A Common Teaching In The Target Language Mistake
  6. No Duct-Taping L2 Fruit On The Foreign Language Proficiency Tree
  7. Management Strategies For The 90+% Target Language Classroom: Increase Student Motivation
  8. My Favorite Activity For Interpersonal Mode (With Links To Handouts)
  9. “They Look At Me Weird” – Dealing With The Awkwardness Of Using L2
  10. 37 Links To Online Resources For “Teaching In The Target Language”

Top 15 Most Helpful Posts For Teachers Who Want To Start Teaching In The Target Language

  1. The First Week Of Staying In The Target Language With Your Students
  2. Q/A: What To Do On The First Week Of Class & When To Use L1
  3. What To Say In The Target Language On The First Day Of Class – Novice L2 Learners
  4. How To Manage Student Behavior & Stay In The Target Language: Increase Motivation
  5. Introduce New Vocabulary AND Stay In The Target Language (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3)
  6. Step By Step Guide For Teaching Grammar In The Target Language (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8)
  7. Assessing A Student’s Progress In A “90+% Target Language Use” Classroom
  8. Turning Tedious Tasks Into Teaching In The Target Language Triumphs
  9. When District Expectations Make It Hard To Teach In The Target Language
  10. 90+% Target Language Use: How To Respond To Administrative Pushback
  11. Dos and Don’ts For Handouts In The 90+% Target Language Classroom
  12. Effective Routines For Upper Elementary L2 Learners
  13. Effective Routines For Lower Elementary L2 Learners
  14. Overcoming The Obstacles To Making Input Comprehensible
  15. How My Walls Help Me Stay In The Target Language

Top 10 Posts To Read If Your Students Resist Instruction In The Target Language:

  1. How To Avoid “Freaking Out” Novice L2 Learners When Staying In The Target Language
  2. “My Students Don’t Feel Comfortable When I Spend Long Amounts Of Time Teaching In The Target Language.”
  3. “Ahhh! How Am I Supposed To Give Activity Directions In The Target Language”
  4. My First Successful “Staying In The TL” Lesson
  5. Interpretive Mode – Build A Reluctant Student’s Confidence
  6. Making The Interpersonal Mode As Easy As Possible For Novice Learners (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4)
  7. ClassDojo.com & Teaching In The Target Language
  8. “They Look At Me Weird” – Dealing With The Awkwardness Of Using L2
  9. My “Staying In The Target Language” Story/Journey (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4)
  10. Helping Students NOT Feel Dumb/Stupid/Embarrassed

Top 15 Most Practical Posts:

  1. Step By Step Guide For Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: “To Have” & “To Want” Verbs
  2. Step By Step Guide For Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Introducing “To NOT Want”
  3. Step By Step Guide For Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching How Change In Quantity Affects The L2 Sentence
  4. Step By Step Guide For Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: “To Eat” Future Tense
  5. Step By Step Guide For Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: “To Eat” Past Tense
  6. Step By Step Guide For Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: “To Listen” & “To Like” Verbs
  7. Step By Step Guide For Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: “To Go” Future, Past & Present Tense
  8. Using Your Hands During Interpersonal Mode Instruction
  9. My Favorite Activity For Interpersonal Mode (With Links To Handouts)
  10. Blindfolded – 5 Tips For Using A Blindfold In Your Foreign Language Classroom
  11. Lionel Messi & A Quick Tip For Staying In The Target Language
  12. Quick Tips: 4 Ideas For Getting Your Students To Use The Target Language
  13. Quick Pics Tip: How To Mention “Happy New Year” With Novice L2 Learners
  14. Technology To Help You Teach In the Target Language: EDpuzzle
  15. You Gotta See This Resource From Post-Primary Languages Initiative

Top 8 Most Reflective/Thoughtful Posts:

  1. How Not (I Repeat: NOT) To Assess The Progress  Of L2 Students In A 90+% Target Language Classroom
  2. Bad Oatmeal & A Simple, Sort Explanation Of How To Stay In The Target Language With Novice Students
  3. What I Learned About Comprehensible Input From My Crawling Infants
  4. The Vocab List Analogy
  5. No Duct-Taping L2 Fruit On The Foreign Language Proficiency Tree
  6. Language To Language OR Language To Living
  7. Being In Diapers And Staying In The Target Language
  8. “They Look At Me Weird” – Dealing With The Awkwardness Of Using L2

Top 10 Nerdiest Posts

  1. Why Do I “Use Fewer Words?” …Input Has Quantitative Qualities
  2. “Why Aren’t They Getting This?” – Input: Multiple Forms & ICI
  3. Forms Of Input – Linguistic & Extralinguistic
  4. Forms Of Input – Representational Input
  5. Forms Of Input – Gesticulated Input
  6. Forms Of Input – Constructed Situational Input
  7. Forms Of Input – Incidental Situational Input
  8. Forms Of Input – Inflectional Input
  9. The Key: “Pairing”
  10. Overcoming The Obstacles To Making Input Comprehensible

Top 10 Posts With Video Demonstrations:

  1. What To Say In The Target Language On The First Day Of Class – Novice L2 Learners
  2. Video Recording: 1st Graders Learning Days Of The Week & Colors In The Target Language
  3. Video Recording: 5th Graders Learning “To Be” Verb Conjugations In The Target Language
  4. Video Recording – Comprehensible L2 Immersion Environment
  5. Senor Howard’s Video & Why He Does What He Does (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3)
  6. Introduce New Vocabulary AND Stay In The Target Language (“i+1)
  7. Making The Interpersonal Mode As Easy As Possible For Novice Learners
  8. Demo Lesson On Video: Cinco De Mayo
  9. Demo Lesson On Video: 2014 World Cup
  10. You Gotta See This Resource From Post-Primary Languages Initiative

Thanks for reading!

Señor Howard

Señor Howard – www.SenorHoward.com/blog – @HolaSrHoward

Caleb Howard – www.SoMuchHope.com – @calhwrd

See what others are saying about Tuesday’s Tips For Staying In The Target Language.

Share your target language teaching experiences!

Leave comments below or add to the conversation on twitter by using #TL90plus (for staying in the target language” comments) and/or #langchat (for general language teaching comments).

Helping Students NOT Feel Dumb/Stupid/Embarrassed & Tips On Teaching Grammar

(*See suggestions/scripts below for using this idea to practice a variety of L2 grammar structures with older and/or more proficient L2 speakers.)


Today I gave each student a bunny…teaching a foreign language

…and I asked them to put it in the right color cup.

foreign language teaching colorsThe problem was that many of the students didn’t know all of their L2 colors yet. …and some of them felt embarrassed if they didn’t know what color cup to choose.

(Side note: I hate it when students feel embarrassed. Shame is such a powerful, action-altering, confidence-smashing emotion and I try to do everything possible to avoid situations in which my students feel shame. (Click here for a post my wife wrote on shame and its effect.) However, sometimes it’s hard to avoid. If a student gets a question wrong or makes a mistake, even though I AM not upset at him, he might feel very upset with himself or very embarrassed in front of his peers. Even if I give the biggest/warmest of smiles when I say, “Robert, you’re wrong,” …wrong is still wrong. And wrong can be embarrassing. And no student likes getting clues because they are too STUPID to know the correct answer immediately.)

So I tried something new today.

I put some classroom objects (L2 vocabulary from the previous unit) next to the colored cups.

foreign language teaching colorsIf the student looked unsure when I said the L2 color, I would quickly say the L2 word for the corresponding classroom object.

My strategy worked well. I didn’t notice very many students feeling embarrassed and I actually sensed that some of them felt empowered. It also helped me introduce new vocabulary AND review old vocabulary at the same time.


(*Suggestions for how this activity can be modified to challenge students with more advanced L2 skills.)

Past tense L2 grammar structures –

Say things like, “Robert, here’s your bunny. Isabel put her bunny in the orange cup. Aiden put his bunny in the green cup. Rachel and Maria put their bunnies in the black cup. You…you put your bunny in the yellow cup.”

Grammar structures for L2 commands –

Say things like, “Robert, here’s your bunny. DON’T PUT the bunny in the orange cup. DON’T PUT the bunny in the green cup. PUT the bunny in the yellow cup.”

Subjunctive grammar structures –

Say things like, “Robert, here’s your bunny. I don’t want you to put the bunny in the orange cup. I wanted Isabel to put the bunny in the orange cup. I wanted Aiden to put the bunny in the orange cup. But not you. I don’t want you to put it in the orange cup. I want you to put the bunny in the green cup.

Future tense L2 grammar structures – 

Before it’s time for students to put their bunnies in the cups, Write/display a list of who will put their bunnies in which cups. Write things like, “Okay class. Here are the bunnies. Robert will put his bunny in the yellow cup. Isabella will put her bunny in the green cup. Rachel and Maria will put their bunnies in the black cup.” Encourage interpersonal mode interactions by asking questions like, “Roneem, look at the list. Who will put their bunny in the green cup?”


 

Señor Howard

Señor Howard – www.SenorHoward.com/blog – @HolaSrHoward

Caleb Howard – www.SoMuchHope.com – @calhwrd

 See what others are saying about Tuesday’s Tips For Staying In The Target Language.

Share your target language teaching experiences!

Leave comments below or add to the conversation on twitter by using #TL90plus (for staying in the target language” comments) and/or #langchat (for general language teaching comments).

My First Successful “Staying In The TL” Lesson

“Woohoo! I did it!”

“Finally an idea worked. Finally, a lesson that helped me successfully stay in the target language for a long amount of time!”

It’s a simple lesson that I came up with before I started staying in the target language. It can be modified to help learners of all ages and proficiency levels.

All you need is crayons (for each student) and a worksheet that looks like this:

rainbow spanish class


 

For Novice Low or Novice Mid

Walk around the classroom. As you give one worksheet to each student, say sentences like these, “Here’s a paper for you. A paper for you. A paper for you. And one for you. Here’s a paper for you. For you, and you and you.”

Then, pass out crayons in the same way: “Crayons for you. For you. Here are some crayons for you…etc.”

Once the materials are passed out, display a sample worksheet at the front of the classroom. Hold a box of crayons in your own hands. Take out a red crayon and hold it up in the air. Motion for the students to do the same. As students are taking out their red crayons, say things like, “Good! Good Aiden! Good! Yes, red. Red. Red. The red crayon! Good Jessica…etc.”

Once all students are holding up the red crayon, have them repeat the word, “red,” after you. Then, turn your back to the class and start coloring in space #1 on the rainbow with the red crayon. When you finish coloring that section, start walking around the room saying, “Good Aiden! Good. Yes. Red. Good.” Hold up a few papers of students who are coloring in space #1 correctly.

When most students are done, hold up your red crayon and say, “Goodbye red!” and put the crayon back in the box. Keep saying, “Goodbye red,” until all students have put away their red crayon.

Go back to the displayed sample worksheet and say, “Okay. Number 1…red,” or, “Okay. Number 1 was red.” Point to space #2 and say, “Number TWO. TWO. Number TWO is orange. Take out orange.” (Hold up the orange crayon.)

Make a coloring motion with the orange crayon and say, “Class. Color #2 orange.” (You may want to say the sentence a few times.) Turn around and start coloring space #2 with the orange crayon.

Repeat this pattern until the rainbow activity is finished. If you want (and if your students would like it) make up a little tune that you can sing while the students are coloring using ONLY the L2 color and number words. (i.e. “Number 1…red. Number 1…red. Number 2…orange. Number 2…orange…etc.”)


 

For Novice High or Intermediate Low

Follow the same pattern (as with Novice Low or Novice Mid) except substitute the simple L2 words for L2 phrases and/or questions.

After the materials are passed out, hold up a crayon and say things like, “Aiden. What color is this? Is this color red or is this color orange? Aiden. Point to something else in this class that is the color red.” (Aiden points to something red.) Teacher says, “Good Aiden. Yes. That flag is red.” Teacher turns to address the whole class and says, “Class. Take out the color red.” As students are taking out the red crayon say things like, “Not the blue crayon. NOT the green crayon. Don’t take out the purple crayon. The RED crayon. The RED crayon. Take out the RED crayon. Good! Yes! Yes! Like Jessica. Good Jessica! Yes class. Take out the RED crayon.”

Ideas For Interpersonal Mode

After you’ve done the rainbow lesson as a whole class, pass out blank worksheets and give instructions for students to work in pairs. Tell the class that they will color the rainbows with mix-matched colors. “Space #1 WON’T be RED. It will be a different color. It will be the color that your partner tells you.” Pass out a small piece of paper to all the Partner #1s in the class and tell them to keep it hidden. The paper will tell them what mix-matched colors to use for all the rainbow spaces.

#1 – Green

#2 – Red

#3 – Purple

Etc.

Walk around the room and make sure each pair of students is speaking only in L2 and coloring according to Partner #1’s instructions.


Intermediate Mid – Advanced Mid

Pass out the worksheet and the crayons. Instruct students to color space #1 RED, space #2 ORANGE and space #3 YELLOW. Tell them not to color spaces 4-6. Write your instructions on the board and have them start coloring.

While they are coloring, SECRETLY change your written instructions by erasing the word, “yellow” and replacing it with the L2 word for “purple.” On your page, color space #1 RED, space #2 ORANGE and space #3 PURPLE.

When all the students are done, start walking around the room with a confused look on your face. Take one of the students’ rainbows (choose a student who is confident and NOT easily embarrassed) and say things like, “Tyler. You colored #1 RED, #2 ORANGE and #3 YELLOW! Yellow!? Why did you color it YELLOW!?” (Let Tyler answer.) Then say, “No, Tyler. I did NOT say to color it YELLOW. I asked you to color it PURPLE! See! Look at the instructions I wrote on the board!”

Let the students start venting their frustration at you in the target language. Encourage them to say things like, “No, Miss. You did NOT say to color it PURPLE. You must have changed your instructions!” Argue back and say, “Why?! Why would I change something like that!? And we all know that the third color of the rainbow is NOT yellow. It’s obviously PURPLE. All of you don’t know what you’re talking about.”

Continue the argument for as long as you’d like. Repeat the incident with instructions for coloring spaces 4-6.

Ideas For Presentational Mode

Ask the students to write a story about a mom/dad doing this rainbow activity with her/his child. Tell the students that their L2 narrative must include dialogue. Have them model their story after the frustrating experience they just had with following your rainbow-coloring instructions. Give them some sample sentences like, “Son…you shouldn’t have colored #2 YELLOW. I told you a thousand times that it was supposed to be ORANGE. I told you that #1 was supposed to be RED and #2 was supposed to be ORANGE. It would be better if you listen more carefully in the future.”


Señor Howard

Señor Howard – www.SenorHoward.com/blog – @HolaSrHoward

Caleb Howard – www.SoMuchHope.com – @calhwrd

 See what others are saying about Tuesday’s Tips For Staying In The Target Language.

Share your target language teaching experiences!

Leave comments below or add to the conversation on twitter by using #TL90plus (for staying in the target language” comments) and/or #langchat (for general language teaching comments).

Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Part 7 – “To Go” (Future, Present & Past Tenses)

In this PART 7 post you’ll find a list of ideas to help you develop lesson plans for teaching…:

  • …the verb “TO GO” (in the future, present & past tenses).
  • …the question word: “Where?”
  • …the days of the week.

Don’t feel limited to what is written below.  Let these simple ideas launch you into developing more creative, thoughtful, and effective ideas.

The only thing you really need to remember is:

“Our main approach/principle for teaching grammar while staying in the target language is…

…give students MEANINGFUL EXPERIENCES in which the target grammar structures are used often enough to be noticed and acquired.”

 


Instructional Activities/Strategies

1- Days Of The Week – Introduction or Review

First, show a calendar that has the days of the week written in the target language.  (If you have a way to project it, it’s fun to use Google Calendar and change the settings so that the days of the week show up in the language that you teach.)  Showing the days of the week on a calendar, and pointing to each one as you say them, is a very simple way of making them comprehensible.  (Side note: For the purposes of this lesson, students don’t need to have the days of the week memorized, nor do the students need to prove that they know the direct translations of the days of the week.  It’s enough that they know that you are talking about days.)

Show the students an oversized calendar and have them repeat the days of the week in the target language.

Show the students an oversized calendar and have them repeat the days of the week in the target language.

Next, write/post the days of the week (from left to right) on the board.  Write them as spread out as possible with enough space below to record some data.

2- “TO GO” – Future Tense

Pick a day of the week.  Under that particular day, write (and at the same time, say) a few sentences like the ones listed, in bold, below.  Each sentence should have the name of a student in it.  At first pick students who tend to be more confident than the others.  Each sentence should also have the name of a place that students would really like to go.  (i.e. McDonald’s, Starbucks, Six Flags…etc.  The purpose of picking locations like these is to peak the students’ interest.  It’s important to peak students’ interest because, depending on their proficiency level, they may have no clue what you are saying/writing.  Remember, when students have no clue what you’re saying, they will quickly lose interest.  Avoid losing the interest of your students by using names of their classmates and by saying the names of places that everyone recognizes and would like to go to.)

“On Thursday, Laura will go to Starbucks.”

“On Thursday, Emily will go to Starbucks.”

“On Thursday, Aidan will go to McDonalds.”

On Thursday, Trista will go to Six Flags.”

After all the sentences are written on the board, step back and say (in the target language), “Wow.  Okay.  Great.  Laura.  Okay.  Laura.  On Thursday, Laura will go to Starbucks.  And Emily.  Yes.  Emily.  Laura and Emily.  On Thursday, Laura and Emily will go to Starbucks.  And Aidan.  On Thursday Aidan will go to McDonalds.  And on Thurdsay, Trista will go to Six Flags.  Great.  Wow.  Great.  Okay.”

Finally, you may want to ask the class to read the sentences on the board out loud in unison.  (Side note: At this point the teacher does not expect the students to know what they are saying.  However the students are still willing to say it and stay engaged because everyone is thinking, “Okay, I’m not sure what’s going on…but it has something to do with my friends Laura, Emily, Aidan and Trista…and it has something to do with these fun places.  What’s gonna happen?  Let me see and find out.”  The names of students (and of exciting places) are keeping the students engaged, even though they aren’t sure what’s being said in the target language.  Meanwhile, something very exciting is happening.  While student interest is peaked, Teacher is introducing the target grammar structures.)

(Side note #2: The fun thing about moments like these is that Teacher gets to introduce and repeat the target grammar structure without the students really even noticing.  The students aren’t actively paying attention to the future tense form of the verb “TO GO”.  They aren’t actively noticing that you taught them a 3rd person plural conjugation for the future tense of “TO GO”.  They are waiting (some of them excitedly waiting) to find out what these classmates are going to do…and what in the world Starbucks, McDonalds and Six Flags have to do with anything).  While they are thinking about something exciting and curious, the teacher is intentionally teaching but the students are learning passively.  The students start learning without trying to learn.  It’s an amazing experience both for the instructor and learner.  Learning L2 by accident!  When my students have moments like these, sometimes I like telling them, “L2 class is like T.V…all you have to do is watch.”)

3- “TO GO” – Present Tense

Teacher pulls out teacher-made signs/printouts that have the words “Starbucks,” “McDonalds” and “Six Flags” in big attractive letters.  Teacher takes the Starbucks sign and hangs it up at one end of the room.  Teacher says, “Class: Starbucks.  This is Starbucks.  Right here is Starbucks. (Teacher motions/points to a defined imaginary place next to the Starbucks sign that is the part of the classroom called Starbucks.)

Teacher repeats sentences like these while she hangs up the other signs in different parts of the room.

Now every student knows where Starbucks, McDonalds and Six Flags are located in the classroom.

Teacher walks back to the middle of the room, shrugs her shoulders and asks the class, “Where is Starbucks?”  When students start pointing to the Starbucks sign, Teacher uses the Two-Hand Method to help them answer the question, “Where is Starbucks?” with the phrase, “There it is.”

Teacher continues asking about the location of the other signs, “Where is McDonalds/Six Flags?” and students answer appropriately by pointing to the sign and saying, “There it is.”

Teacher goes to the sentences on the board and reads all four while she looks at them.

Teacher looks away from the sentences and looks directly at Laura and says, “Laura, on Thursday, where do you go?  On Thursday do you go to Starbucks?  On Thursday do you go to McDonalds?  OR on Thurdsay do you go to Six Flags?”  When Laura answers with the word Starbucks (because it’s so obvious) Teacher writes the answer in complete sentence form and uses the Two-Hand Method to help Laura say, “On Thursday I go to Starbucks.”  Teacher praises Laura for her complete sentence answer saying, “Great.  Good Laura.  Good job Laura.”  Teacher motions for Laura to stand and says, “Laura, stand up.”  Teacher motions for Laura to walk to the spot on the classroom floor beneath the “Starbucks” sign and says, “Go to Starbucks.”  Teacher gives Laura a reward/incentive for answering/participating/going-first.  (Side note: At this point, Laura may feel very “put on the spot”.  She may have felt a bit embarrassed to be going first and to be instructed to stand up and walk in front of all her peers.  (Again, that’s why Teacher should pick confident students to go first for activities like these.)  Teacher should have a high-desire reward to give to Laura for going first.  An even better reward situation would be to pick two high-quality rewards and say, “Good Laura.  Good job.  Do you want ___(reward #1) or ____ (reward #2)?”  Have class give Laura a round of applause.  If any of Laura’s peers acts obnoxious or does something to make her feel awkward…there must be a significant consequence…or else no other student will want to participate because they will feel afraid of their peers making fun of them.)

Teacher continues by looking away from Laura and directly at Emily and repeats the line of questioning/script that she used with Laura (in the paragraph above).

Teacher continues this pattern with Aidan and then Trista.

Before moving on to step #4 Teacher may choose to do all of steps 2 (future tense) and 3 (present tense) over again with new student volunteers.  The purpose of the repetition is to make sure that the whole class has a good understanding of what’s happening before introducing the new target grammar structures from step 4 (below).

4- “TO GO” – Past Tense

Once steps 2 and 3 are done, Teacher should make sure all student volunteers are seated.  Teacher should write the following questions/answers on the board and have a discussion with students about what happened (past tense) in steps 2 and 3:

“On Thursday, who went to Starbucks?”

“On Thursday, _____ went to Starbucks.”

“On Thursday, who went to McDonalds?”

Etc.

Getting Everyone Involved

Once the students feel moderately familiar with steps 2, 3 and 4 it will be easier to get everyone involved.  Try some of the following ideas:

  • Add more “locations” around the room.  (i.e. “the park,” “the movie theater,” “the mall,” “Taco Bell,” “Local Ice Cream Store,” etc.)
  • Do a whole week in fast-motion.  Make a list of the days of the week on the board.  Write down a long list of sentences in the target language (future tense) delineating which students will go to which places on each of the particular days.  Teacher can point to any particular day of the week on the calendar and see if each of the students know where to go based on the sentences written on the board.  At any point Teacher can stop and ask questions in the future, present and past tenses.  When practicing the target grammar structures it would be good to have the questions and answers written/posted somewhere conspicuous.
  • Ask students to write down or say (in the TL) where their peers will go on different days of the week.  After a few of these directions have been written down or said, their classmates will have to walk around to the correct places in the room.
  • Recycle this activity throughout the year.  Call the activity something catchy in the target language (i.e. “Let’s Go!” or “Where Will We Go Today?”).  Give the students chances to review/practice these grammar structures at random times throughout the year.

Assessment Ideas

  • After students are familiar with steps 2-4, start recording whether they walk to the appropriate spot in the room when the cue/direction is given.  Use a rubric to assign a grade based on whether they walked to the correct spot needing help or not, or after walking to incorrect spot(s) or not, etc.
  • Write a “model email to a friend” on the board in front of all the students.  The email should contain information about where you go on certain days of the week.  Ask students to answer comprehension questions based on the information included in the “model email to a friend.”
  • Ask students to write text messages to each other or to you.  You can do this on real devices or, if that is not possible, make a “text-message-conversation-template” to print out and have students fill in the conversation bubbles in pairs.  Students should use the target grammar structures to ask and answer questions about their plans for the week and where they will go or where they would like to go.  Students can also ask their friends questions like, “Where did you go last Saturday?”

REFLECT: What did the students experience during this activity?

  • Students got to get up and walk around the room.
  • Students repeatedly heard, read and said different forms of the verb for “TO GO.”
  • Students passively learned the word, “Where?”
  • Students used the interpersonal mode to help Teacher compile relevant information.
  • Students wrote in the target language.
  • Unit assessments were meaningful and generally non-threatening to reluctant students.
  • Digital assessment option allows students to practice collaborating and to learn 21st century skills.
  • The teacher stayed in the target language.
  • The students realized that they could not only survive in an L2-immersion environment but that it can be fun.

Have you tried out any of these grammar teaching suggestions from Tuesday’s Tips for Staying in the Target Language?  How did it go?  Leave comments below or add to the conversation on twitter by using #langchat (for general language teaching comments) and/or #TL90plus (for staying in the target language” comments).

See what others are saying about Tuesday’s Tips For Staying In The Target Language.

learn Spanish with Señor Howard

 

Señor Howard – www.SenorHoward.com – @HolaSrHoward

Part 1 – Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: “To Have” and “To Want” Verbs

 Part 2 – Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Introducing “To (NOT) Want”

Part 3 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching How Change in Quantity Affects The L2 Sentence

Part 4 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching Future Tense of “To Eat”

Part 5 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching Past Tense of “To Eat”

Part 6 – Teaching “To Listen” & “To Like/Not Like” – Various Tenses

Part 7 – Teaching “TO GO” – Various Tenses

Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Part 6 – “To Listen” & “To Like”

In this PART 6 post you’ll find a list of ideas to help you develop lesson plans for teaching the verb “TO LISTEN” and some “Statements of Preference” (TO LIKE/LOVE/ENJOY).  For step-by-step examples of how to teach these types of lessons, please see the comprehensive lesson transcripts from parts 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 of this series entitled, “Teaching Grammar In The Target Language.”

Remember, our main approach/principle for teaching grammar while staying in the target language is…

…give students MEANINGFUL EXPERIENCES in which the target grammar structures are used often enough to be noticed and acquired.

 


Instructional Activities/Strategies

Making learning the verbs "TO LISTEN" and "TO LIKE" meaningful and engaging by using and discussing music in the target language.

Making learning the verbs “TO LISTEN” and “TO LIKE” meaningful by listening to and discussing music in the target language.

1- “To Listen” – Future Tense

First, identify a variety of popular musical selections from the target culture.  Introduce the verb forms of “to listen” by saying (in the target language) things like, “Michael will listen to Song #1.  Rachael will listen to Song #2.  William and Thomas will listen to Song #3 and the rest of us will listen to song #4.”

Help students practice the introduced forms of the verb by continuing in the following fashion, “Class, who will listen to Song #2? (Students answer.)  And who will listen to Song #1?  (Students answer.) etc.”

Help students practice writing complete sentences that include these verb forms by doing the following: “Okay Class.  Let’s write it on the board.  Ummm.  Who will listen to Song #1? (Student answers.)  Great.  Let’s write that on the board so we can remember.”  Repeat until the written list is complete.

2- “To Listen” – Present Progressive Tense | “To Like or Not Like” Present Tense

Use iPads, CD players, computers, listening stations to allow the students to listen to the assigned songs.  The first time the songs are played students should only be asked to listen.

The second time the songs are played, circulate throughout the room and ask students, “Are you listening to Song #1 or are you listening to Song #2?”  Motion thumbs up or thumbs down and ask, “Do you like the song or do you not like the song?”

3- “To Listen” – Past Tense | “To Like or Not Like” Past Tense

Conduct a debriefing time and ask questions like, “Class, what song did Rachael listen to?”  (Class answers and Teacher continues.)  “Rachael, is it true?  Did you listen to Song #1?  …or did you listen to Song #2?”  AND, “Rachael did you like Song #1 or did you not like Song #1?”

Reinforcement / Student Practice ideas:

Repeat steps 1, 2 and 3 several times over the span of a week or 2 weeks.  Assign different songs to each student every time the activity is repeated.

Assessment Ideas:

Non-Digital Assessment Option:  Teacher writes a friendly letter (addressed to “Dear _____”) using content and grammar structures from this unit.  (i.e.  “Hi.  How are you?  I like music.  Do you like music?  I like the song called ______.  I listened to the song 4 times on Sunday.  Do you listen to the song called ______?  Do you like the song or do you not like the song?  What songs do you like?”

For the assessment students must write back.  Create a rubric to help students know how you will grade them.

Digital Assessment Option:  Distribute iPads, laptops or simply pen and paper.  Create a Google Doc and share the shareable link with each student.  Students open the Google Doc on their device and prepare to collaborate.  Teacher writes a series of questions for students to answer while also asking the questions outloud.  Students follow the progression of questions verbally and on their screen.  Students are only required to find the question(s) next to their name and answer.  Questions can include, “Rachael what songs did you listen to?”  “Rachael, which songs did you like?”  “Rachael, which songs did you not like?” Rachael is required to write her answer on the Google Doc.

Alternatively, Teacher can have the questions already written.

REFLECT: What did the students experience during this activity?

  • Students repeatedly heard, read and said different forms of the verb for “to listen and to like”.
  • Students used the interpersonal mode to help Teacher compile relevant information.
  • Students wrote in the target language.
  • Unit assessments were meaningful and generally non-threatening to reluctant students.
  • Digital assessment option allows students to practice collaborating and to learn 21st century skills.
  • The teacher stayed in the target language.
  • The students realized that they could not only survive in an L2-immersion environment but that it can be fun.

Have you tried out any of these grammar teaching suggestions from Tuesday’s Tips for Staying in the Target Language?  How did it go?  Leave comments below or add to the conversation on twitter by using #langchat (for general language teaching comments) and/or #TL90plus (for staying in the target language” comments).

Stay tuned to over the next weeks for more blog posts on teaching grammar while staying in the target language.

 See what others are saying about Tuesday’s Tips For Staying In The Target Language.

Señor Howard

Señor Howard – www.SenorHoward.com/blog – @HolaSrHoward

Caleb Howard – www.SoMuchHope.com – @calhwrd

Your voice is valuable! Share your target language teaching experiences!

Leave comments below or add to the conversation on twitter by using #TL90plus (for staying in the target language” comments) and/or #langchat (for general language teaching comments).

Part 1 – Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: “To Have” and “To Want” Verbs

 Part 2 – Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Introducing “To (NOT) Want”

Part 3 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching How Change in Quantity Affects The L2 Sentence

Part 4 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching Future Tense of “To Eat”

Part 5 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching Past Tense of “To Eat”

Part 6 – Teaching “To Listen” & “To Like/Not Like” – Various Tenses

Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Part 5 | “To Eat” | Past Tense

So far in this series entitled, “Teaching Grammar In The Target Language,” we’ve discussed:

  • Teaching “To Want” and “To Have” Verbs – Part 1
  • Focusing on “To NOT Want” and “To NOT Have” Verbs – Part 2
  • Teaching subject pronouns Part 1 & Part 2
  • Numbers review – Part 3
  • Teaching how sentence components change with quantity change – Part 3
  • Teaching future tense conjugations of the verb “To Eat” – Part 4
  • Teaching L2 “Question Words” – Part 2, Part 3 & Part 4

In this post (Part 5) we will discuss how to introduce the past tense forms of some verbs while staying in the target language.

Remember our main approach/principle for teaching grammar while staying in the target language is…

…give students MEANINGFUL EXPERIENCES in which the target grammar structures are used often enough to be noticed and acquired.

Read the following script of how a teacher uses this approach in the foreign language classroom.  (Note: The following Part 5 transcript is written in English, although you should imagine the teacher saying all of her statements in the language that you teach.  i.e. French, Russian, Arabic, etc.)

Teacher reviews some of the Parts 1, 2, 3 and 4 target grammar structures by saying/doing the following:

Without saying anything, Teacher passes out several individual size boxes of variety cereals (including Cheerios, Cinnamon Toast Crunch and Lucky Charms) to students who are sitting quietly and attentively.  Everytime Teacher places a box on a student’s desk, she motions for silence and stillness by saying, “Shhh.”

Once the cereal is passed out, and all students are sitting quietly (and no cereal box has been opened), Teacher writes the following L2 sentences on the board:

“Who has Lucky Charms?”  “Who will eat Lucky Charms?”

“_____ has Lucky Charms.”  “____ will eat Lucky Charms.”

While standing next to the sentences on the board, Teacher starts looking around the room and identifies which student has which cereal by saying, “Rontrell has Cheerios.  Okay. Rontrell will eat Cheerios.  Isabella has Cheerios too.  Yes.  Rontrell and Isabella have Cheerios.  So Rontrell will eat Cheerios and Isabella will eat Cheerios.  And.  …and… (teacher looks around the room to see who else has a different variety cereal) …and, let’s see…umm…William.  Yes, William.  William doesn’t have Cheerios.  William has Cinnamon Toast Crunch.  Yes, William has Cinnamon Toast Crunch.  Rontrell and Isabella have Cheerios…and…William has Cinnamon Toast Crunch.  Rontrell and Isabella will eat Cheerios and William will eat Cinnamon Toast Crunch.”

Teacher raises her hand, (to imply that she would like students to volunteer to answer her questions) and asks, “Who has Lucky Charms?  Who will eat Lucky Charms?”  Teacher calls on a volunteer to answer.  If the student answers with an incomplete sentence, Teacher uses the Two-Hand Method to elicit a complete L2 sentence.  Teacher rewards students for participating and using the target language.  (Consider using ClassDojo.com to reward on-task behavior.)

Teacher continues asking students the target questions from the board until she feels all students, or almost all, have understood how they are supposed to use these L2 questions and answers.

Teacher walks towards a student (who has cereal) and says, “Rontrell.  Go ahead.  Eat.  Eat.  Eat your Cheerios.”  Teacher walks to  Isabella and says, “Isabella.  Go ahead.  Eat.  Eat.  Eat your Cheerios.”  Teacher continues saying this to all the cereal eaters until all of them have opened the boxes and eaten their cereal.  After each student has received directions to eat, and while students are still eating, Teacer keeps saying, “Eat.  Eat.  Eat your cereal.  Yum.  Delicious.  Delicious.  Eat.  Eat.”

When students are done eating, Teacher asks each student to throw away the trash and return to their seats to pay attention to the next portion of the lesson.

To introduce past tense forms of the verb “To Eat”:

Teacher pauses in front of the room looks at all the students who have returned to their seats from throwing away their trash.

Teacher writes the following L2 phrase on the board:

“I ate ______.”

Teacher walks to Rontrell and says, “What did you eat?  Did you eat Cinnamon Toast Crunch or did you eat Cheerios?”  (If Rontrell answers with an incomplete sentence, Teacher points to the board to imply that he should answer completely using the sentence written on the board.  If Rontrell has trouble, Teacher uses the Two-Hand Method to help him succeed.)

Teacher walks to Isabella and says, “Isabella, what did you eat?  Did you eat Cinnamon Toast Crunch or did you eat Cheerios?”  Teacher waits for Isabella’s answer and accepts it if/when it’s a complete L2 sentence.

Teacher continues like this until all cereal-eating students have been asked (and have answered) the target question, “What did you eat?”

Teacher introduces and practices the 3rd person form of the past tense verb by doing the following:

Teacher walks to the board and tries to write down who ate which cereals.  Teacher will purposefully get confused and write some wrong answers.  She uses this strategy to motivate students to use L2.  Students will think it’s funny and fun to see Teacher’s mistakes and correct them.  At the same time they will be having to learn and use the correct 3rd person form of a past tense L2 verb.

Teacher goes to the board and begins to write the list:

Rontrell ate Cheerios.

William ate Cheerios. (side note: incorrect)

Students start interrupting and saying, “No, no, no!” because William didn’t eat Cheerios.  Isabella ate Cheerios.

Noticing that the students are correcting her, Teacher turns around from her writing and says, “William didn’t eat Cheerios?  Are you sure?  William didn’t eat Cheerios?”  Teacher uses the Two-Hand Method to help the students say, “No!  William did not eat Cheerios.”  Teacher pretends like she understands now and says, “Okay.  Rontrell ate Cheerios but William did NOT eat Cheerios.  Right?”

Teacher picks a confident student and asks him, “Rontrell ate Cheerios…and…who else?  Aidan ate Cheerios?  Rachel ate Cheerios?  Who?  Who else ate Cheerios?”  Teacher uses the Two-Hand Method to help the confident student answer, “Rontrell ate Cheerios and Isabella ate Cheerios.”

Teacher thanks the student for the correct contribution and makes the necessary changes to what’s written on the board.

Teacher continues the activity in this fashion until there is a complete and correct list of student names on the board next to the correct cereal variety that they ate.

REFLECT: What did the students experience during this activity?

  • Students repeatedly heard, read and said different forms of the past tense verb for “to eat”.
  • Students used the interpersonal mode to help Teacher compile relevant information.
  • The teacher stayed in the target language.
  • The students realized that they could not only survive in an L2-immersion environment but that it can be fun.
  • The students reviewed present tense and future tense forms of the verb “to eat”.

Have you tried out any of these grammar teaching suggestions from Tuesday’s Tips for Staying in the Target Language?  How did it go?  Leave comments below.

Stay tuned to over the next weeks for more blog posts on teaching grammar while staying in the target language.

 See what others are saying about Tuesday’s Tips For Staying In The Target Language.

Señor Howard

Señor Howard – www.SenorHoward.com/blog – @HolaSrHoward

Caleb Howard – www.SoMuchHope.com – @calhwrd

Your voice is valuable! Share your target language teaching experiences!

Leave comments below or add to the conversation on twitter by using #TL90plus (for staying in the target language” comments) and/or #langchat (for general language teaching comments).

Part 1 – Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: “To Have” and “To Want” Verbs

 Part 2 – Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Introducing “To (NOT) Want”

Part 3 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching How Change in Quantity Affects The L2 Sentence

Part 4 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching Future Tense of “To Eat”

Part 5 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching Past Tense of “To Eat”

Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Part 4 | “To Eat” Future Tense

So far in this series entitled, “Teaching Grammar In The Target Language,” we’ve discussed:

  • Teaching “To Want” and “To Have” Verbs – Part 1
  • Focusing on “To NOT Want” and “To NOT Have” Verbs – Part 2
  • Teaching subject pronouns Part 1 & Part 2
  • Numbers review – Part 3
  • Teaching how sentence components change with quantity change – Part 3

In this post (Part 4) we will discuss how to introduce the future tense forms of some verbs while staying in the target language.

Remember our main approach/principle for teaching grammar while staying in the target language is…

…give students MEANINGFUL EXPERIENCES in which the target grammar structures are used often enough to be noticed and acquired.

Read the following script of how a teacher uses this approach in the foreign language classroom.  (Note: The following Part 4 transcript is written in English, although you should imagine the teacher saying all of her statements in the language that you teach.  i.e. French, Russian, Arabic, etc.)

Teacher reviews some of the Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3 target grammar structures by saying/doing the following:

“I have Cheerios.  I have 2 boxes of Cheerios.” (Teacher pulls them out of a bag or out from under a desk.)  “Yes.  I have 2 boxes of Cheerios.  (Pause)  Also…  Also I have Lucky Charms.  Yes.  I have Lucky Charms.  I have 2 boxes of Lucky Charms.”  (Teacher pulls them out and puts them next to the two boxes of Cheerios.)  “I have 2 boxes of Cheerios and I have 2 boxes of Lucky Charms.  (Pause)  Also… Also I have Cinnamon Toast Crunch.  I have 2 boxes of Cinnamon Toast Crunch.”  (Teacher pulls them out and puts them next to the other 4 boxes.)  “I have 2 boxes of Cheerios AND I have 2 boxes of Lucky Charms AND I have 2 boxes of Cinnamon Toast Crunch.  (Pause)  You (teacher points to a student) …you don’t have Cheerios.  You (teacher points to another student) …you don’t have Cheerios.  I have Cheerios.  But you…and you…and you…and you don’t have Cheerios.  (Pause.  Teacher walks back to her boxes of cereal.  She looks at them and pats her hungry stomach and says…) “Delicious.  Delicious Cheerios.  Delicious Lucky Charms.  Delicious Cinnamon Toast Crunch.”

Teacher walks to the board and writes the following questions/phrases:

“Who wants ______?” (Note: The blank is for the cereal choice.)

“______ wants ______.” (Note: The 1st blank is for a student name and the 2nd blank is for their cereal choice.)

 Teacher raises her hand (to indicate that she is looking for volunteers) and says, “Who wants Lucky Charms?  Who wants Lucky Charms?  Who wants Lucky Charms?  Let’s see…  Oh…Daniel wants Lucky Charms.  And…I see Kristen wants Lucky Charms.  Dae’Quan wants Lucky Charms.”  After making these observations, Teacher randomly picks a student name and says, “Aiden, do you want Lucky Charms?  Yes or no.”  If student says “yes,” then Teacher uses the Two-Hand-Method to help him to say, “I want Lucky Charms.”  Once Aiden says the complete L2 sentence, Teacher should look pleased and say to the class, “Oh Aiden says, ‘I want Lucky Charms.  Wow.  Good Aiden!  Aiden says, ‘I want Lucky Charms.'”  Teacher gives the Lucky Charms to Aiden and says, “Here Aiden.  You have Lucky Charms.  But Aiden!  Aiden!  Don’t eat them.  Leave them right here.  (Teacher points to the corner of the desk.)  Don’t eat them!  Okay, Aiden?  Don’t eat them.”

Teacher pauses and gets the box of Cinnamon Toast Crunch.  Teacher raises her hand (to indicate that she is looking for volunteers) and says, “Who wants Cinnamon Toast Crunch?” and repeats the line of questioning/discussion from the paragraph above.  (Remember all of this repeating has a purpose.  It’s allowing your students to notice the target grammar structures/rules that you are trying to help them acquire.  They won’t notice or acquire them unless you repeat them tirelessly.  Additionally, they will be bored if you don’t make the repitition meaningful and engaging.  Remember: we should purpose to give students MEANINGFUL EXPERIENCES in which the target grammar structures are used often enough to be noticed and acquired.  In this model lesson, the food (and the opportunity to eat it in class) is what makes the experience meaningful.)

Teacher repeats this line of questioning until all 6 boxes of cereal are passed out on the corners of the desks of 6 students.  (Side note: If you are “Desk Free,” like Ashley Uyaguari, you can modify the activity by placing the box of cereal in front of the student seated on a rug.)

To start introducing the future tense of the verb “to eat,” Teacher writes the following L2 phrases on the board (where the 1st blank is for the student name and the 2nd blank is for the cereal choice):

“______ will eat ______.”

“Who will eat ______?”

“_______ will eat ______.”

Teacher walks around the room saying, “Hmmm.  Okay.  Okay.  Let’s see.  Umm.  Aiden.  Aiden.  Yes.  Aiden will eat Lucky Charms.  Yes.  That’s right.  Yes.  Aiden will eat Lucky Charms.  And…  and…  and…Daniel will eat Lucky Charms.  Aiden will eat Lucky Charms and Daniel will eat Lucky Charms.  And.  …and.  …and Cinnamon Toast Crunch?  Let’s see.  Allison will eat Cinnamon Toast Crunch.  And Lucas will eat Cinnamon Toast Crunch.  And Wilson will eat Cheerios.  And Roneem will eat Cheerios.  Yes!  Yes!  Great.  Aiden will eat Lucky Charms.  (Teacher points to Aiden and each of the following students that she will mention.)  Daniel will eat Lucky Charms.  Allison and Lucas will eat Cinnamon Toast Crunch.  And Cheerios?  Wilson will eat Cheerios and Roneem will eat Cheerios.”

Teacher pauses and moves toward the board implying that she wants to write this information down so as not to forget it.  With her back to the students she starts writing who will eat each cereal but then pretends to forget parts of the information.

Teacher writes and says, “Aiden will eat Lucky Charms.”  And then Teacher starts sounding confused and makes the mistake of writing, Allison will eat Lucky Charms.”  At this point some students might start correcting the teacher.  The teacher uses the Two-Hand-Method to help them say, “No Teacher!  Allison will not eat Lucky Charms.  Daniel will eat Lucky Charms.”  Teacher realizes her mistake and says, “Oh yes.  Duh!  Oh yes.  Allison will not eat Lucky Charms.  Daniel will eat Lucky Charms.”  Teacher erases her mistake on the board and replaces Allison’s name with Daniel’s name and starts from the top saying, “Aiden will eat Lucky Charms.  Daniel will eat Lucky Charms.  Okay…ummm… (sounds confused again, and asks:) …Class…who will eat Cinnamon Toast Crunch?”

Students take turns using the target language to help the teacher make a list (on the board in complete L2 sentences) of delineating which students will eat the cereal varieties.  Teacher may choose to ask students to help by giving answers verbally.  Teacher may also allow one student at a time to come to the board and use the dry erase markers to write the correct and complete L2 sentences.

To introduce first and second person forms of the future tense verb, Teacher can ask questions like, “Aiden what will you eat?  Will you eat Cinnamon Toast Crunch or will you eat Lucky Charms?”  If student struggles to come up with the appropriate answer you can write it on the board or use the Two-Hand Method.

REFLECT: What did the students experience during this activity?

  • Students repeatedly heard and read how to use “to eat” in the future tense.
  • Students used the interpersonal mode to help Teacher compile relevant information.
  • The teacher stayed in the target language.
  • The students realized that they could not only survive in an L2-immersion environment but that it can be fun.
  • The students learned some first person, second person and third person verb conjugations.
  • The students saw L2 in written form.

Have you tried out any of these grammar teaching suggestions from Tuesday’s Tips for Staying in the Target Language?  How did it go?  Leave comments below.

Stay tuned to over the next weeks for more blog posts on teaching grammar while staying in the target language.

 See what others are saying about Tuesday’s Tips For Staying In The Target Language.

Señor Howard

Señor Howard – www.SenorHoward.com/blog – @HolaSrHoward

Caleb Howard – www.SoMuchHope.com – @calhwrd

Your voice is valuable! Share your target language teaching experiences!

Leave comments below or add to the conversation on twitter by using #TL90plus (for staying in the target language” comments) and/or #langchat (for general language teaching comments).

Part 1 – Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: “To Have” and “To Want” Verbs

 Part 2 – Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Introducing “To (NOT) Want”

Part 3 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching How Change in Quantity Affects The L2 Sentence

Part 4 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching Future Tense of “To Eat”

Part 5 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching Past Tense of “To Eat”

Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Part 3 – Teaching How Change in Quantity Affects The L2 Sentence

So far in this series entitled, “Teaching Grammar In The Target Language,” we’ve discussed:

  • Teaching “To Want” and “To Have” Verbs – Part 1
  • Focusing on “To NOT Want” and “To NOT Have” Verbs – Part 2
  • Teaching subject pronouns Part 1 & Part 2

In this post we will discuss how to stay in the target language while helping students learn how L2 sentence components change when the quantity of an noun is changed.

Remember:

Some people say it’s nearly impossible to teach grammar while staying in the target language.  This IS the case if you feel like your job is to directly teach grammar.  However, a simple change in approach (as demonstrated in these posts) makes it much easier to help your students use correct L2 grammar structures.  Notice, in the script below, that the model teacher is not trying to directly teach grammar.  Instead, she’s helping students have a MEANINGFUL EXPERIENCE in which the target grammar structures are used often enough to be noticed and acquired.  If this is your strategy, learning grammar doesn’t have to be a headache for your students.

(Note: The following Part 3 transcript is written in English, although you should imagine the teacher saying all of her statements in the language that you teach.  i.e. French, Russian, Arabic, etc.)

Teacher reviews grammar structures from Part 1 and Part 2 of this series by facilitating the following activity:

Teacher writes the following L2 phrases on the board:

“Who has Cheerios?  Who has Lucky Charms?  Who doesn’t have Cinnamon Toast Crunch?”

“______ has Cheerios.  ____ doesn’t have Cinnamon Toast Crunch.”

Teacher passes out some individual boxes of the three cereal varieties to students who are sitting quietly and attentively.  (Remember, behavior management is a HUGE factor affecting how successful you are at facilitating foreign language acquisition by staying in the target language.)

Teacher walks around the room/circle saying the following phrases: “You… (points at student) …have Cheerios.  And you… (points at another student) …have Cheerios.  I… (points to self) …don’t have Cheerios.  You… (points at another student) …don’t have Cheerios.  But you DO HAVE Lucky Charms.  Mmmm.  Delicious.  I… (points to self) …I want Lucky Charms.  Yes.  I want Lucky Charms.  Give me Lucky Charms.”  (Student shakes head “NO” because he doesn’t want to give them up.  Teacher helps him say, “They are FOR ME!” by using the Two-Hand-Method.)  Teacher, in a surprised voice, says, “The Lucky Charms are for YOU?  For you??!?  But I want them.  I want Lucky Charms.  (Teacher helps student say (again) “They are FOR ME!”.)  Teacher gives up and says, “Okay.  The Lucky Charms are for you.”

Teacher walks back to the board and asks the first of several rounds of questions to various students in the class.  “Roger has Cheerios.  Stacey has Cheerios.  Lauren has Cheerios.  But…who has Lucky Charms?  Does Elvin have Lucky Charms?  Does Daequan have Lucky Charms?  WHO… (Teacher raises her hand to imply that she’s looking for a volunteer to answer the question) …has Lucky Charms?”  Student answers.  If the answer is not complete, teacher points to the target answer, that is written on the board, and helps the student say it in a complete L2 sentence.  Teacher continues, “More.  More.  More.  Who else has Lucky Charms?”  Teacher continues this questioning pattern with all of the target questions that are written on the board.

When it’s time to move on, Teacher focuses the attention on herself by opening a bag of Cinnamon Toast Crunch.  Teacher starts to eat the cereal and says, “Delicious.  Delicious.  I like this.  I like this a lot.”  Teacher walks around the room with the open bag and says, “Who wants Cinnamon Toast Crunch?  Who wants some?  Who wants some?”  Teacher reminds students how to say, “I do!  I want some!  I want Cinnamon Toast Crunch!” by using the Two-Hand-Method.

Teacher focuses on quantity by saying, “How many?  How many do you want?  How many Cinnamon Toast Crunch pieces do you want?  Do you want one?  Do you want four?  Do you want seven?”  If Student says an incomplete answer, use the Two-Hand-Method to help him say, “I want seven.”  When Student says the complete sentence, Teacher counts out seven pieces of Cinnamon Toast Crunch.  Teacher says, “Eat.  Go ahead.  Eat seven.”  Teacher prompts Student to say, “Thank you,” and, “Delicious.”  Teacher looks at the rest of the class and says, “Who else?  Who else wants some?  Who else wants Cinnamon Toast Crunch?  I want Cinnamon Toast Crunch and he wants some (Teacher points to the student that ate seven).  Who else wants Cinnamon Toast Crunch?”  Teacher helps students answer with complete L2 sentences.  Teacher says to Student #2, “How many pieces do you want? Do you want one piece?  Do you want 2 pieces?  Do you want one piece or four pieces?  Do you want one piece or six pieces?”  Teacher helps Student #2 answer with a complete sentence.  Teacher continues this pattern of questioning for as long as she thinks is best.

REFLECT: What did the students experience during this activity?

  • Students saw how the noun (in this case “pieces”) ending changes based on how many “pieces” of cereal they wanted.
  • Students heard how to say the L2 words for “for you” and “for me.”
  • Students got a meaningful review of target language numbers.
  • The teacher stayed in the target language.
  • The students realized that they could not only survive in an L2-immersion environment but that it can be fun.
  • The students naturally learned some subject pronouns.
  • The students learned some first person, second person and third person verb conjugations.
  • The students saw L2 in written form.
  • The students practiced responding to L2 questions with complete L2 answers.

Have you tried out any of these grammar teaching suggestions from Tuesday’s Tips for Staying in the Target Language?  How did it go?  Leave comments below.

Stay tuned to over the next weeks for more blog posts on teaching grammar while staying in the target language.

 See what others are saying about Tuesday’s Tips For Staying In The Target Language.

Señor Howard

Señor Howard – www.SenorHoward.com/blog – @HolaSrHoward

Caleb Howard – www.SoMuchHope.com – @calhwrd

Your voice is valuable! Share your target language teaching experiences!

Leave comments below or add to the conversation on twitter by using #TL90plus (for staying in the target language” comments) and/or #langchat (for general language teaching comments).

Part 1 – Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: “To Have” and “To Want” Verbs

 Part 2 – Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Introducing “To (NOT) Want”

Part 3 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching How Change in Quantity Affects The L2 Sentence

Part 4 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching Future Tense of “To Eat”

Part 5 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching Past Tense of “To Eat”

Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Part 2 – Introducing “To (NOT) Want”

It’s not that hard to teach grammar while staying in the target language.  Additionally, learning grammar doesn’t have to be a headache for your students.

In PART 1, of this “Teaching Grammar In The Target Language” series, we discussed how to teach “To Have” and “To Want” verbs.  In this post you’ll read the transcript for a step-by-step guide to introducing “To Not Want” and teaching the words for “or” & “and.”  (Note:  The transcript is written in English, although you should imagine the teacher saying all of her statements in the language that you teach.  i.e. French, Russian, Arabic, etc.)

See how easy it can be to help your students learn grammar while staying in the target language!

See how easy it can be to help your students learn grammar while staying in the target language!

Teacher pulls out an individual box of Cheerios.  Teacher says, “I have Cheerios.  (pause)  I have Cheerios.  (pause)  I have Cheerios but YOU… (teacher points to a student) …YOU don’t have Cheerios.  And you… (teacher points to another student) …you don’t have Cheerios.  I… (teacher points to herself) have Cheerios but you (teacher points to a student) …don’t.  And you…(teacher points to another student) …don’t.  And you don’t.  And you don’t have.  And you don’t have.  And you don’t have Cheerios.  ALL OF YOU, all of you, all of you (teacher is pointing to the whole class)  All of you don’t have Cheerios.  But I do.  I have Cheerios.”

“Delicious.”

“Delicious.”

“I like Cheerios.”

(Teacher opens Cheerios and starts eating them.)  “Delicious.  Delicious.  I like Cheerios.  I have Cheerios and you don’t.  You don’t have Cheerios but I do have Cheerios.”  (Teacher might choose to sing the following phrases to rub it in: “I have Cheerios.  Delicious Cheerios.  You don’t have Cheerios.  I have Cheerios.)

Teacher pauses.  Teacher goes to the board and writes, “Who wants Cheerios?” and “I want Cheerios,” in the target language.  Teacher pulls more boxes of Cheerios out of the bag.  Teacher raises her hand and asks, “Who wants Cheerios?”  Teacher identifies 4 students with their hands raised and helps them answer the target question by pointing to the written answer on the board or by using the two-hand method.

After the four students have said, “I want Cheerios,” Teacher goes to the board and writes (in the TL), “Who has Cheerios?  _____ has Cheerios,” and “Who doesn’t have Cheerios?  _____ doesn’t have Cheerios.”  (At this point the teacher may choose to sit down and use the discussion, that follows, as a formative assessment.  Teacher will ask students either of the questions that are written on the board and assess student responses based on their correctness/completeness.)

When the discussion/assessment is finished, teacher pulls out an individual box of Lucky Charms, Cinnamon Toast Crunch and Cheerios.  Teacher says, “I have Cheerios.  I have Lucky Charms.  I have Cinnamon Toast Crunch.”  Teacher goes to a student who has Cheerios and says, “I have Cheerios.  I have Cinnamon Toast Crunch and I have Lucky Charms. (pauses)  You have Cheerios.  But you don’t have Lucky Charms.  And you don’t have Cinnamon Toast Crunch.”  (Teacher may choose to repeat this step several times with other students who have Cheerios but not the sweet cereals.)

Teacher goes to several students, who have no cereal, and asks, “Do you want Cheerios or do you want Cinnamon Toast Crunch?”  (Teacher helps the student say, “I want ____.”)  To a student who says, “I want Cinnamon Toast Crunch,” the teacher responds, “You don’t want Cheerios? (waits for student to shake his head ‘no’)  You DON’T want Cheerios?”  (Teacher helps the student respond by saying, “I don’t want Cheerios.  I want Cinnamon Toast Crunch.”

After the student says the phrase successfully, teacher writes on the board, “Do you want Cheerios?” and, “I don’t want Cheerios.  I want _____.”  Teacher spends time asking students, “Do you want Cheerios?” and helping them answer with the sentences that are written on the board.  (Teacher may choose to reward student use of the target language by giving students several pieces of their preffered cereal to eat.)

 REFLECT: What did the students experience during this activity?

  • The teacher stayed in the target language.
  • The teacher administered a formative assessment.
  • The students experience a formative assessment in a very low-anxiety, natural way.
  • The students realized that they could easily survive in an L2-immersion environment.
  • The students naturally learned some subject pronouns.
  • The students learned some first person, second person and third person verb conjugations.
  • The students naturally learned how to make something negative.
  • The students saw L2 in written form.
  • The students practiced responding to L2 questions with complete L2 answers.
  • The students got repeated chances to acquire the words “and” & “or” in the target language.

Have you tried out any of these grammar teaching suggestions from Tuesday’s Tips for Staying in the Target Language?  How did it go?  Leave comments below or add to the conversation on twitter by using #langchat (for general language teaching comments) and/or #TL90plus (forstaying in the target language comments).

Stay tuned to over the next weeks for more blog posts on teaching grammar while staying in the target language.

 See what others are saying about Tuesday’s Tips For Staying In The Target Language.

Señor Howard

Señor Howard – www.SenorHoward.com/blog – @HolaSrHoward

Caleb Howard – www.SoMuchHope.com – @calhwrd

Your voice is valuable! Share your target language teaching experiences!

Leave comments below or add to the conversation on twitter by using #TL90plus (for staying in the target language” comments) and/or #langchat (for general language teaching comments).

Part 1 – Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: “To Have” and “To Want” Verbs

 Part 2 – Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Introducing “To (NOT) Want”

Part 3 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching How Change in Quantity Affects The L2 Sentence

Part 4 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching Future Tense of “To Eat”

Part 5 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching Past Tense of “To Eat”

 

Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: “To Have” & “To Want” Verbs

Goodbye memorization.  Adiós drills.  Auf Wiedersehen worksheet packets.

Say hello, bonjour and 您好 to students beginning to say, “I forgot I was learning a language,” “I learned it without even trying,” and “I can’t believe that was so easy.”

Teachers can make learning L2 grammar natural and almost effortless.

Teaching grammar doesn’t have to be a headache for you or your students.

Read the following transcript of how a foreign language teacher makes even acquiring L2 grammar skills easy for her L2 students.  (Note:  The transcript is written in English, although you should imagine the teacher saying all of her statements in the language that you teach.  i.e. French, Russian, Arabic, etc.)

“Hello students.”

(Students stand at the entrance of the foreign language classroom.)

“John. You sit here.  (Teacher points to the chair in which John should sit.)  Stacey.  You sit here.  Carlos.  You sit here.  Jenny.  You sit here.”  (Etc. until all the students are seated.)

“And I…  …I sit here.  (Teacher sits down.)  No.  No, no, no.  I don’t sit here.  (Teacher moves to a different seat.)  I sit here.   Mmm…no.  I don’t sit here, either.  No, no, no.  (Teacher moves to yet a different seat.)  I sit here.  Yes.  Yes.  That’s right.  I sit here.  I don’t sit there (Teacher points to her first chair).  I don’t sit there.  (Teacher points to her second chair).  I sit here.  Yes.  Here is where I sit.”

(Teacher has a bag.  Inside the bag is a variety pack of breakfast cereals.  Teacher pulls out an individual box of Cheerios and prepares to speak very slowly and with intention.)

Using fun and inexpensive food can help you teach grammar by staying in the target language and making it FUN!

Put the textbooks and your use of L1 aside. Instead use Cheerios to help your students acquire even tough L2 grammar skills in a fun and natural way.

“Class.  I have Cheerios.   Mmmmmm.  Delicious.  I have Cheerios.  Delicious, delicious, delicious.  I have Cheerios.  I have Cheerios and I like Cheerios.”  (Teacher points to a student across the room.)  “You. (Teacher gives an evil smile.)  You don’t have Cheerios.  I have Cheerios but you don’t.  You don’t have Cheerios.  Only me.  I have Cheerios.  Delicious, delicious Cheerios.”  (Teacher points to another student.)  “You.  (Evil smile.)  You don’t have Cheerios.  I have Cheerios but you don’t.  You don’t have Cheerios. AND you (Teacher points to the first student.) you don’t have Cheerios.  But I do.  I have Cheerios.”

(Teacher stands up with Cheerios in hand.  Teacher writes on the board the following L2 sentences.  “I have Cheerios.”  “You don’t have Cheerios.”)

(Teacher starts walking around the room, with her box of Cheerios, pointing to various students.)

“I have Cheerios.  But you don’t.  You don’t have Cheerios.  And you don’t.  You don’t have Cheerios.  And you don’t.  And you don’t have.  And you don’t have.  And you don’t have.  And you don’t have Cheerios.”  (Teacher continues until she has pointed to all students and told them that they don’t have Cheerios.)

(Teacher sits down back in her chair.  Teacher looks satisfied.  Teacher takes a deep, satisfied breath and says:)

“But I do.  I do have.  I have Cheerios.”

(Long dramatic pause.  Class is completely silent.)

(Teacher looks at the student next to her, named William.  Teacher pulls out a second individual box of Cheerios.  Teacher looks at the second box of Cheerios.  Teacher looks at William.  Looks back at Cheerios.  Looks back at William.  Teacher shrugs her shoulders and, with a happy smile on her face, gives the second box of Cheerios to William.)

(Teacher stands up and writes the following three sentences on the board: “I have Cheerios.  William has Cheerios.  You don’t have Cheerios.)

(Teacher goes around the room repeating the following phrases in the target language:  “I have Cheerios.  William has Cheerios.  But you don’t have Cheerios.”)

(Teacher takes out 4 more boxes of Cheerios.  Teacher asks random students:)

“Do you want Cheerios?”  (Teacher models how to say, “Yes I want Cheerios,” with the two hand method.  Teacher continues to walk around the room asking, “Do you want Cheerios?” and helping students to say, “I want Cheerios,” or, “Yes, I want Cheerios.”)

(Teacher gives the 4 boxes of Cheerios to 4 students who are sitting especially quiet, attentive and still.)

(Teacher writes on the board (in the target language) “Who has Cheerios?”  “_____ has Cheerios.”  “Who doesn’t have Cheerios?”  “______ doesn’t have Cheerios.”  Additionally, the teacher may choose to write, “Does _____ have Cheerios?”  “Yes, ______ has Cheerios.  No, _______ doesn’t have Cheerios.”)

(Standing next to the written sentences on the board, Teacher begins asking students the target questions and helps students respond by pointing to each word in the correct answer.  After each student attempts an L2 answer, the student should be rewarded. i.e. classdojo.com points.  Teacher continues this discussion (in L2) until class time is over.  If students get bored (from the repetitiveness) Teacher may choose to stop the activity and show some related L2 videos or do some other attention-getting activity.)

REFLECT: What did the students experience during this activity?

  • The teacher stayed in the target language.
  • The students realized that they could easily survive in an L2-immersion environment.
  • The students naturally learned some subject pronouns.
  • The students learned some first person, second person and third person verb conjugations.
  • The students naturally learned how to make something negative.
  • The students saw L2 in written form.
  • The students practiced responding to L2 questions with complete L2 answers.
  • The students got rewarded every time they offered L2 answers.

Your approach to teaching a foreign language can have a huge difference in what your students experience in the L2 classroom.  Your approach makes the difference between students thinking that it’s:

  • challenging or easy.
  • complicated or simple.
  • overwhelming or exciting.
  • work-intensive or second-nature.
  • intentional or natural.

I’m starting to realize that foreign language teachers CAN structure an L2 learning environment to give students an experience of actually forgetting that they are learning a second language.  If it’s done right, students can actually learn L2 without even trying to learn L2.  (More on this in future blog posts)

My next blog posts will be like this one.  I’ll give many additional examples of how to teach different verbs, L2 question words, subject pronouns, past, present and future tenses and more.

How about you?  How do you make learning L2 grammar as easy and as natural as possible for your students.  Leave comments below.

 See what others are saying about Tuesday’s Tips For Staying In The Target Language.

Señor Howard

Señor Howard – www.SenorHoward.com/blog – @HolaSrHoward

Caleb Howard – www.SoMuchHope.com – @calhwrd

Your voice is valuable! Share your target language teaching experiences!

Leave comments below or add to the conversation on twitter by using #TL90plus (for staying in the target language” comments) and/or #langchat (for general language teaching comments).

Part 1 – Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: “To Have” and “To Want” Verbs

 Part 2 – Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Introducing “To (NOT) Want”

Part 3 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching How Change in Quantity Affects The L2 Sentence

Part 4 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching Future Tense of “To Eat”

Part 5 –  Step-By-Step Guide for Teaching Grammar In The Target Language: Teaching Past Tense of “To Eat”